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News & Discussion

3 Inventors and How Their Inventions Changed the World P2

Oct 24, 2017 12:00 AM

The field of science is packed with a broad history of scientific facts and wonderous inventions drafted by ingenious thinkers who enjoyed tinkering. Science encompasses extensive subject matter ranging from biology to earth science, to technology, and medicine.

History books have emphasized some famous inventors, and you may recognize some of their names that are stated in this article. However, you may be surprised to learn personal facts, as well as other accomplishments that they achieved during their lifetime. As the second post in this series, the scientists that will be mentioned are Galileo, Benjamin Franklin, and Tim Berners-Lee.

Galileo Galilei was born into a noble family in Florence, Italy in 1564. Although his parents were of noble status, they were poor but determined to give their son a better future. They made many personal sacrifices and sent their son to medical school. Much to his parent’s dismay, Mr. Galilei did not continue in the medical field, and instead shifted his focus and attended the University of Pisa. He taught mathematics here but abandoned his post after three years because he was being harassed due to his opposing view of Aristotle. Over the course of the 20years or so that followed, Galileo derived theories about gravity, the solar system, and the universe, as well as how things operate, also referred to as mechanics. He also investigated Copernicus and other teachers who had a profound impact on him, thus his influence on the world.

Galileo is most famous for the invention of the telescope. This fantastic piece of equipment was invented in 1069, and the first telescope could magnify objects by 2x. Mr. Galilei continued to perfect his telescope and developed a tool that had a magnification of 30x. Because of this latest form of technology, he was able to support Copernicus’s theory of heliocentrism, which states that the earth revolves around the sun. This was unheard of because the Catholic Church only followed the biblical teaching, that the earth was the center. Today’s telescopes have magnifications of up to 190x! Imagine what you could see with that. I bet people could see the colors of Saturn’s rings. Wouldn’t that be a sight?

Benjamin Franklin is one of the most famous of all the American scientists. Not only was he an inventor, but he was also an ambassador to England, an author, a businessman, and a philosopher. Franklin was born to a very large family in January 1706. He had 16 brothers and sisters. Young Ben was supposed to continue the family business of candle making and a printing shop; however, he left home when his father reprimanded him for writing articles under a pen name. Hence, he moved to the “City of Brotherly Love,” Philadelphia. Mr. Franklin traveled to England numerous times in hopes of convincing King George III to remove the taxes that the colonies were being forced to pay. The king refused, and this was one of the factors that contributed to the American Revolutionary War. According to Biography Online, (http://www.biographyonline.net/politicians/american/benjamin-franklin.html), during his travels to England, he became known as the “Water American” because he did not consume pints of liquor as was customary in London. Benjamin was a deep thinker and found himself developing 13 virtues in which he conducted himself, one of which was, temperance.

Mr. Franklin is best known for his discovery of electricity, as well as the glass harmonica and bifocal spectacles. Did you know that he also invented the first metal-lined fireplace? This is called the Franklin Stove and was invented in 1742. The homes in America at that time were heated by fireplaces, which did not hold in the heat very well because the heat from the fire escapes up the chimney. The Franklin Stove; however, holds and radiates the heat into the rooms when the door is left open and even after the fire has gone out. This is because it is made from cast iron which, in this case, is a good heat conductor.

People all over the world use the internet, thanks to a man named Tim Berners-Lee. He was born in London, England in 1955 and attended Oxford University. There, he received a Physics Degree. Mr. Berners-Lee worked in Switzerland with a company that required him to share information with others. He wanted to find a way to transmit this information faster. It is this task that prompted his search for a means to transmit information that is accessible to all people. In 2009, he worked on a project in the United Kingdom whose goal was to make certain documents available to the British citizens. These documents and information are called hypertext. Tim also received some prestigious awards. Mr. Berners-Lee was knighted in 2004, and in 2007, he was added to the list of honorees on the Queen’s Order of Merit. He was also awarded the Mikhail Gorbachev Award for “The Man Who Changed the World” in 2011, and in 2012, Tim was recognized for his invention of the internet at the Summer Olympics. Although the public may assume that Mr. Berners-Lee is well off, he is not. In fact, he lives a humble lifestyle and enjoys time with his family.

Mr. Berners-Lee is modest when it comes to taking credit for inventing the world wide web. He said that the technology was already there, the hypertext was available, he simply merged everything so that they functioned as a whole unit. His primary objective for developing the internet is to benefit all humanity. As a result, the internet does not have a patent.

In this article, you can easily see the vast subjects that science covers. These men used their skills and talents for the betterment others.


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